1000PA

| 1000 Prehistorc Animals | Dinosaurs, Fossils, Ruins | Articles and News |

  • Home
  • Anthropology
  • Archaeology
  • Evolution

    • Evolution / Charles Darwin

      Life on Earth evolved from a universal common ancestor approximately 3.8 billion years ago...

  • Paleontology

Thu06222017

Last update04:28:52 PM GMT

Back Paleontology Early Mammals

Early Mammals

Egg-laying mammal: Scientists discover that for Australia the long-beaked echidna may not be a thing of the past

The western long-beaked echidna, one of the world's five egg-laying species of mammal, became extinct in Australia thousands of years ago…or did it? Smithsonian scientists and colleagues have found evidence suggesting that not only did these animals survive in Australia far longer than previously thought, but that they may very well still exist in parts of the country today.

The team's findings are published in the Dec. 28, 2012 issue of the journal ZooKeys.

With a small and declining population confined to the Indonesian portion of the island of New Guinea, the western long-beaked echidna (Zaglossus bruijnii) is listed as "Critically Endangered" on the International Union for Conservation of Nature's Red List of Threatened...

Evidence contradicts idea that starvation caused saber-tooth cat extinction

In the period just before they went extinct, the American lions and saber-toothed cats that roamed North America in the late Pleistocene were living well off the fat of the land.

That is the conclusion of the latest study of the microscopic wear patterns on the teeth of these great cats recovered from the La Brea tar pits in southern California. Contrary to previous studies, the analysis did not find any indications that the giant carnivores were having increased trouble finding prey...

Giant fossil turtle from Colombia round like car tire

1000pa (July 11, 2012) — Paleontologist Carlos Jaramillo's group at the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute in Panama and colleagues at North Carolina State University and the Florida Museum of Natural History discovered a new species of fossil turtle that lived 60 million years ago in what is now northwestern South America.

The team's findings were published in the Journal of Paleontology.

The new turtle species is named Puentemys mushaisaensis because it was found in...

Oldest-ever reptile embryos unearthed

1000pa (Apr. 11, 2012) — Dating back 280 million years or so, the oldest known fossil reptile embryos have been unearthed in Uruguay and Brazil. They belong to the ancient aquatic reptiles, mesosaurs. The study of these exceptionally well-preserved fossils suggests that mesosaurs were either viviparous[1] (pushing back this mode of reproduction by 60 million years) or that they laid eggs in advanced...

Mammals shrink at faster rates than they grow: Research helps explain large-scale size changes and recovery from mass extinctions

1000pa (Jan. 30, 2012) — Just how big can mammals get and how fast can they get there? These are questions examined by an international team of researchers exploring increases in mammal size after the dinosaurs became extinct 65 million years ago.

Research published in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences shows it took about 10 million generations for terrestrial mammals to hit their maximum mass: that's about the size of a cat evolving into the size of an...

Mouse to elephant? Just wait 24 million generations

1000pa (Jan. 30, 2012) — Scientists have for the first time measured how fast large-scale evolution can occur in mammals, showing it takes 24 million generations for a mouse-sized animal to evolve to the size of an elephant.

Research published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences describes increases and decreases in mammal size following the extinction of the dinosaurs 65 million years ago

Led by Dr Alistair Evans of Monash University's School of...

Pristine reptile fossil holds new information about aquatic adaptations

1000pa (Nov. 16, 2011) — Extinct animals hide their secrets well, but an exceptionally well-preserved fossil of an aquatic reptile, with traces of soft tissue present, is providing scientists a new window into the behavior of these ancient swimmers.

According to the study published in PLoS ONE's Nov. 16 issue, the fossil, characterized by a team led by Johan Lindgren of Lund University in Sweden, is from the mosasaur family, a group of...

1000pa (Nov. 16, 2011) — Extinct animals hide...

Prehistoric crocodile Terminonaris was Texas native, fossil suggests

1000pa (July 21, 2011) — Making its first appearance in Texas, a prehistoric crocodile thought to have originated in Europe now appears to have been a native of the Lone Star State.

The switch in origins for the genus known as Terminonaris is based on the identification of a well-preserved, narrow fossil snout that was discovered along the shoreline of a lake near Dallas.

The 96-million-year-old fossil from Texas is the oldest prehistoric...

1000pa (July 21, 2011) — Making its first...

Birch mouse ancestor discovered in Inner Mongolia is new species of rare 'living fossil'

1000pa (May 25, 2011) — Tiny fossil teeth discovered in Inner Mongolia are a new species of birch mouse, indicating that ancestors of the small rodent are much older than previously reported, according to paleontologist Yuri Kimura, Southern Methodist University in Dallas.

Fossils of the new species were discovered in sediments that are 17 million years old, said Kimura, who identified the new species and named it Sicista primus to include...

1000pa (May 25, 2011) — Tiny fossil teeth...

Sniff sniff: Smelling led to smarter mammals, researchers say

1000pa (May 20, 2011) — A rose by any other name would smell as sweet; the saying is perhaps a testament to the acute sense of smell that is unique to mammals. Paleontologists have now discovered that an improved sense of smell jumpstarted brain evolution in the ancestral cousins of present-day mammals. The research appeared in the 20 May 2011 issue of the journal Science.

The findings may help explain why mammals evolved such large and...

1000pa (May 20, 2011) — A rose by any other name...

Missouri elk are being reintroduced in the wrong part of the state, anthropologist says

1000pa (Apr. 28, 2011) — According to prehistoric records, elk roamed the northwestern part of Missouri until 1865. Now, the Missouri Department of Conservation is planning to reintroduce elk, but this time in the southeast part of the state. While a University of Missouri anthropologist believes the reintroduction is good for elk, tourism and the economy, he said the effort may have unintended negative consequences that are difficult to...

1000pa (Apr. 28, 2011) — According to prehistoric...

Fossil sirenians, related to today's manatees, give scientists new look at ancient climate

1000pa (Apr. 24, 2011) — What tales they tell of their former lives, these old bones of sirenians, relatives of today's dugongs and manatees. And now, geologists have found, they tell of the waters in which they swam.

While researching the evolutionary ecology of ancient sirenians -- commonly known as sea cows -- scientist Mark Clementz and colleagues unexpectedly stumbled across data that could change the view of climate during the Eocene...

1000pa (Apr. 24, 2011) — What tales they tell...

Long-sought fossil mammal with transitional middle ear

1000pa (Apr. 17, 2011) — Paleontologists from the American Museum of Natural History and the Chinese Academy of Sciences announce the discovery of Liaoconodon hui, a complete fossil mammal from the Mesozoic found in China that includes the long-sought transitional middle ear. The specimen shows the bones associated with hearing in mammals -- the malleus, incus, and ectotympanic -- decoupled from the lower jaw, as had been predicted, but...

1000pa (Apr. 17, 2011) — Paleontologists from the...

Protein from bones of 600,000-year-old mammoth extracted successfully

1000pa (June 4, 2011) — Researchers from the University of York and Manchester have successfully extracted protein from the bones of a 600,000-year-old mammoth, paving the way for the identification of ancient fossils.

Using an ultra-high resolution mass spectrometer, bio-archaeologists were able to produce a near complete collagen sequence for the West Runton Elephant, a Steppe Mammoth skeleton which was discovered in cliffs in Norfolk in...

1000pa (June 4, 2011) — Researchers from the...

Fossil bird study describes ripple effect of extinction in animal kingdom

1000pa (Mar. 9, 2011) — A University of Florida study demonstrates extinction's ripple effect through the animal kingdom, including how the demise of large mammals 20,000 years ago led to the disappearance of one species of cowbird.

The study shows the trickle-down effect the loss of large mammals has on other species, and researchers say it is a lesson from the past that should be remembered when making conservation, game and land-use...

1000pa (Mar. 9, 2011) — A University of Florida...

Fossils of horse teeth indicate 'you are what you eat'

1000pa (Mar. 4, 2011) — Fossil records verify a long-standing theory that horses evolved through natural selection, according to groundbreaking research by two anatomy professors at New York College of Osteopathic Medicine (NYCOM) of New York Institute of Technology.

Working with colleagues from Massachusetts and Spain, Matthew Mihlbachler, Ph.D., and Nikos Solounias, Ph.D. arrived at the conclusion after examining the teeth of 6,500 fossil...

1000pa (Mar. 4, 2011) — Fossil records verify...

98.6 degrees Fahrenheit ideal temperature for keeping fungi away and food at bay

1000pa (Dec. 30, 2010) — Two researchers at Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University have found that our 98.6° F (37° C) body temperature strikes a perfect balance: warm enough to ward off fungal infection but not so hot that we need to eat nonstop to maintain our metabolism.

"One of the mysteries about humans and other advanced mammals has been why they are so hot compared with other animals," said study co-author Arturo...

1000pa (Dec. 30, 2010) — Two researchers at...

Africa has two elephant species, genetic analysis confirms

1000pa (Dec. 22, 2010) — Contrary to the belief of many scientists (as well as many members of the public), new research confirms that Africa has two -- not one -- species of elephant. Scientists from Harvard Medical School, the University of Illinois, and the University of York in the United Kingdom used genetic analysis to prove that the African savanna elephant and the smaller African forest elephant have been largely separated for...

1000pa (Dec. 22, 2010) — Contrary to the belief of...

Being good moms couldn't save the woolly mammoth

1000pa (Dec. 21, 2010) — New research from The University of Western Ontario leads investigators to believe that woolly mammoths living north of the Arctic Circle during the Pleistocene Epoch (approx. 150,000 to 40,000 years ago) began weaning infants up to three years later than modern day African elephants due to prolonged hours of darkness.

This adapted nursing pattern could have contributed to the prehistoric elephant's eventual...

1000pa (Dec. 21, 2010) — New research from The...

Colossal fossil: Museum's new whale skeleton represents decades of research

1000pa (Dec. 16, 2010) — There's a whale of a new display at the University of Michigan Exhibit Museum of Natural History, a leviathan that represents a scientific saga of equally grand proportions.

A complete, 50-foot-long skeleton of the extinct whale Basilosaurus isis, which lived 37 million years ago, now is suspended from the ceiling of the museum's second floor gallery and will reign over an updated whale evolution exhibit scheduled...

1000pa (Dec. 16, 2010) — There's a whale of a...

Dogs have bigger brains than cats because they are more sociable, research finds

1000pa (Nov. 28, 2010) — Over millions of years dogs have developed bigger brains than cats because highly social species of mammals need more brain power than solitary animals, according to a study by Oxford University.

For the first time researchers have attempted to chart the evolutionary history of the brain across different groups of mammals over 60 million years. They have discovered that there are huge variations in how the brains of...

1000pa (Nov. 28, 2010) — Over millions of...

First Bird

First Bird
What was the earliest known bird?

Unexplained artifacts

unexplained artifacts
The 10 most amazing unexplained artifacts

Evolution

Timeline: Human Evolution

Biggest Dinosaurs

The 10 Biggest Dinosaurs

Fossils 

Fossil Formation: How Do Fossils Form?
 

Book review

Dinosaurs Encyclopedia

Book Review

Dinosaurs: The Most Complete, Up-to-Date Encyclopedia for Dinosaur Lovers of All Ages ... WRITTEN BY A PROFESSIONAL paleontologist specifically for young readers, this guide to the Dinosauria is packed...