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Lost Treasures

Capt. Kidd shipwreck site to be dedicated 'Living Museum of the Sea'

1000pa (May 6, 2011) — Nearly three years after the discovery of the shipwreck Quedagh Merchant, abandoned by the scandalous 17th century pirate Captain William Kidd, the underwater site will be dedicated as a "Living Museum of the Sea" by Indiana University, IU researcher and archeologist Charles Beeker, and the government of the Dominican Republic.

The dedication as an official underwater museum will take place off the shore of Catalina...

1000pa (May 6, 2011) — Nearly three years after the discovery of the shipwreck Quedagh Merchant, abandoned by the scandalous 17th century pirate Captain William Kidd, the underwater site will be dedicated as a "Living Museum of the Sea" by Indiana University, IU researcher and archeologist...

Artifacts in Texas predate Clovis culture by 2,500 years, new study shows

1000pa (Mar. 25, 2011) — Researchers in Texas have discovered thousands of human artifacts in a layer of earth that lies directly beneath an assemblage of Clovis relics, expanding evidence that other cultures preceded the Clovis culture in North America. This pre-Clovis toolkit appears to be between 13,200 and 15,500 years old and it includes biface and blade technology that may have later been adapted -- and improved upon -- by the Clovis...

1000pa (Mar. 25, 2011) — Researchers in Texas...

Basketry from Peru's Huaca Prieta

1000pa (Mar. 23, 2011) — A collection of plant fiber artifacts woven by inhabitants of Huaca Prieta, a pre-Columbian site of the Late Preceramic Period in northern Peru, is making its way to the laboratory of Dr. James Adovasio, director of the Mercyhurst Archaeological Institute.

One of the world's leading authorities in the analysis of basketry, textiles, cordage and other plant fiber-derived artifacts in prehistoric societies, Adovasio...

1000pa (Mar. 23, 2011) — A collection of plant...

Atlantis found? Film highlights professor’s efforts to locate fabled lost city

1000pa (Mar. 13, 2011) — Could the fabled lost city of Atlantis have been located? Using satellite photography, ground-penetrating radar and underwater technology, a team of experts (led by University of Hartford professor and archaeologist Richard Freund) has been surveying marshlands in Spain to look for proof of the ancient city. If the team can match geological formations to Plato's descriptions and date artifacts back to the time of...

1000pa (Mar. 13, 2011) — Could the fabled lost...

Scanning antiquity underfoot

1000pa (Mar. 8, 2011) — According to rough estimates, there are some 20,000 undiscovered archaeological sites in Israel waiting to be explored. Currently buried under highways or beneath cities, some could reveal historic monuments from the biblical past and give us clues to the expansion and settlement of modern man as he made his way through the Fertile Crescent.

But where to begin? Who decides which sites should be "dug" -- at...

1000pa (Mar. 8, 2011) — According to rough estimates...

Archaeologist models past and future landscapes

1000pa (Feb. 20, 2011) — Archaeology is a vital tool in understanding the long-term consequences of human impact on the environment. Computational modeling can refine that understanding. But according to Arizona State University archaeologist C. Michael Barton, it takes a revolution in thought, along with the newest methods of modeling, to produce a comprehensive picture of the past that can help inform land-use decisions for our future.

Bar...

1000pa (Feb. 20, 2011) — Archaeology is a...

Earliest humans not so different from us, research suggests

1000pa (Feb. 15, 2011) — That human evolution follows a progressive trajectory is one of the most deeply-entrenched assumptions about our species. This assumption is often expressed in popular media by showing cavemen speaking in grunts and monosyllables (the Geico Cavemen being a notable exception). But is this assumption correct? Were the earliest humans significantly different from us?

In a paper published in the latest issue of Current...

1000pa (Feb. 15, 2011) — That human evolution...

Lost whaling shipwreck with link to Melville's Moby-Dick discovered in the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands

1000pa (Feb. 14, 2011) — Maritime heritage archaeologists working with NOAA's Office of National Marine Sanctuaries have found the nationally-significant wreckage of a famous 1800's Nantucket whale ship, Two Brothers, on a reef off French Frigate Shoals, nearly six hundred miles northwest of Honolulu, in the remote Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument.

This rare archaeological discovery is the first discovery of a wrecked whaling ship...

1000pa (Feb. 14, 2011) — Maritime heritage...

Modern humans reached Arabia earlier than thought, new artifacts suggest

1000pa (Jan. 27, 2011) — Artifacts unearthed in the United Arab Emirates date back 100,000 years and imply that modern humans first left Africa much earlier than researchers had expected, a new study reports. In light of their excavation, an international team of researchers led by Hans-Peter Uerpmann from Eberhard Karls University in Tübingen, Germany suggests that humans could have arrived on the Arabian Peninsula as early as 125,000 y...

1000pa (Jan. 27, 2011) — Artifacts unearthed in...

Data matrix codes used to catalogue archaeological heritage

1000pa (Jan. 21, 2011) — Researchers at the Centre for the Studies of Archaeological and Prehistoric Heritage (CEPAP) of Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona (UAB) have implemented an innovative system to register archaeological artifacts which eliminates problems in manual markings, such as errors in writing or erosion of data. The system, based on direct labelling using bi-dimensional data matrix (DM) codes, has been used by the CEPAP team d...

1000pa (Jan. 21, 2011) — Researchers at the...

New technology gives on-site assessments in archaeology

1000pa (Nov. 18, 2010) — The ability to tell the difference between crystals that formed naturally and those formed by human activity can be important to archaeologists in the field. This can be a crucial bit of information in determining the ancient activities that took place at a site, yet archaeologists often wait for months for the results of laboratory tests.

Now, however, an international team of physicists, archaeologists and...

1000pa (Nov. 18, 2010) — The ability to tell the...

Origin of skillful stone-tool-sharpening method pushed back more than 50,000 years

1000pa (Oct. 29, 2010) — A highly skillful and delicate method of sharpening and retouching stone artifacts by prehistoric people appears to have been developed at least 75,000 years ago, more than 50,000 years earlier than previously thought, according to a new study led by the University of Colorado at Boulder.

The new findings show that the technique, known as pressure flaking, took place at Blombos Cave in South Africa during the Middle...

1000pa (Oct. 29, 2010) — A highly skillful...

Paradise lost -- and found: Researchers unearth ancient water secrets at royal garden dig

1000pa (Oct. 30, 2010) — Ancient gardens are the stuff of legend, from the Garden of Eden to the Hanging Gardens of Babylon. Now researchers at Tel Aviv University, in collaboration with Heidelberg University in Germany, have uncovered an ancient royal garden at the site of Ramat Rachel near Jerusalem, and are leading the first full-scale excavation of this type of archaeological site anywhere in the pre-Hellenistic Levant.

According to...

1000pa (Oct. 30, 2010) — Ancient gardens are the...

Archaeological sites threatened by rising seas: Scientists issue call to action

1000pa (Oct. 28, 2010) — Should global warming cause sea levels to rise as predicted in coming decades, thousands of archaeological sites in coastal areas around the world will be lost to erosion. With no hope of saving all of these sites, archaeologists Torben Rick from the Smithsonian Institution, Leslie Reeder of Southern Methodist University, and Jon Erlandson of the University of Oregon have issued a call to action for scientists to...

1000pa (Oct. 28, 2010) — Should global warming...

Did Neanderthals make jewellery after all?

1000pa (Nov. 1, 2010) — The theory that later Neanderthals might have been sufficiently advanced to fashion jewellery and tools similar to those of incoming modern humans has suffered a setback. A new radiocarbon dating study, led by Oxford University, has found that an archaeological site that uniquely links Neanderthal remains to sophisticated tools and jewellery may be partially mixed.

The study, published in the early online version of...

1000pa (Nov. 1, 2010) — The theory that later...

Pre-Columbian societies in Amazon may have been much larger and more advanced than thought

1000pa (Oct. 25, 2010) — The pre-Columbian Indian societies that once lived in the Amazon rainforests may have been much larger and more advanced than researchers previously realized. Together with Brazilian colleagues, archaeologists from the University of Gothenburg have found the remains of approximately 90 settlements in an area South of the city of Santarém, in the Brazilian part of the Amazon.

"The most surprising thing is that many...

1000pa (Oct. 25, 2010) — The pre-Columbian...

Neanderthals had feelings too, say researchers

1000pa (Oct. 5, 2010) — Pioneering new research by archaeologists at the University of York suggests that Neanderthals belied their primitive reputation and had a deep seated sense of compassion.

A team from the University's Department of Archaeology took on the 'unique challenge' of charting the development of compassion in early humans.

The researchers examined archaeological evidence for the way emotions began to emerge in our ancestors...

1000pa (Oct. 5, 2010) — Pioneering new...

No evidence for Clovis comet catastrophe, archaeologists say

1000pa (Oct. 1, 2010) — New research challenges the controversial theory that an ancient comet impact devastated the Clovis people, one of the earliest known cultures to inhabit North America.

Writing in the October issue of Current Anthropology, archaeologists Vance Holliday (University of Arizona) and David Meltzer (Southern Methodist University) argue that there is nothing in the archaeological record to suggest an abrupt collapse of...

1000pa (Oct. 1, 2010) — New research challenges...

Human activity may have boosted shellfish size, archaeological study shows

1000pa (Aug. 31, 2010) — In a counter-intuitive finding, new research from North Carolina State University shows that a species of shellfish widely consumed in the Pacific over the past 3,000 years has actually increased in size, despite -- and possibly because of -- increased human activity in the area.

"What we've found indicates that human activity does not necessarily mean that there is going to be a negative impact on a species -- even...

1000pa (Aug. 31, 2010) — In a...

Secrets of a vanished English landscape: Geologists examine 5,000-year-old 'fossilized' landscape

1000pa (Aug. 18, 2010) — A team of scientists led by the University of Leicester has published new research on a fossilised landscape, providing insights into how an ancient environment functioned.

Thousands of years ago the English Fenlands, stretching across what is now Cambridgeshire, Lincolnshire and north Norfolk was a gigantic coastal swamp, not quite land and not quite sea, but inhabited by Bronze Age settlers who hunted and fished...

1000pa (Aug. 18, 2010) — A team of scientists...

Stone Age remains are Britain's earliest house

1000pa (Aug. 10, 2010) — The team from the Universities of Manchester and York reveal today that the home dates to at least 8,500 BC -- when Britain was part of continental Europe.

The research team unearthed the 3.5 metres circular structure next to an ancient lake at Star Carr, near Scarborough, a site comparable in archaeological importance to Stonehenge.

The team are currently excavating a large wooden platform next to the lake, made of...

1000pa (Aug. 10, 2010) — The team from the...

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Book review

Dinosaurs Encyclopedia

Book Review

Dinosaurs: The Most Complete, Up-to-Date Encyclopedia for Dinosaur Lovers of All Ages ... WRITTEN BY A PROFESSIONAL paleontologist specifically for young readers, this guide to the Dinosauria is packed...